Jeremiah 3-4 — False repentance

Every once in a while, my daughter will do something wrong, and we’ll tell her to apologize.  But when she does, she sometimes makes light of it, almost singing, “I’m sorrryyy.”

And that’s how Judah was.  God said of them,

You have the brazen look of a prostitute; you refuse to blush with shame.  Have you not just called to me: ‘My Father, my friend from my youth, will you always be angry?  Will your wrath continue forever?’  This is how you talk, but you do all the evil you can. (3:3-5)

With their lips, they said “I’m sorry,” but their actions showed they were not sorry at all.

God then compared them to the northern kingdom of Israel that had been exiled.  God said that he divorced them because of their adulteries (that is, he exiled them because of their idolatry).  But despite seeing this, the people of Judah didn’t repent.  Oh, they said the words of repentance, but did not truly repent in their hearts.  God said of them,

“In spite of all this, her unfaithful sister Judah did not return to me with all her heart, but only in pretense,” declares the Lord.   The Lord said to me, “Faithless Israel is more righteous than unfaithful Judah.” (3:10-11)

What does God mean by this?  “Either repent, or don’t.  I’d prefer outright rebellion than false piety.”

But of course, true repentance is what God truly wants.  And so he says,

“Return, faithless Israel,” declares the Lord, “I will frown on you no longer, for I am merciful,” declares the Lord, “I will not be angry forever.  Only acknowledge your guilt – you have rebelled against the Lord your God, you have scattered your favors to foreign gods under every spreading tree, and have not obeyed me,” declares the Lord.  “Return, faithless people,” declares the Lord, “for I am your husband…Return, faithless people; I will cure you of backsliding.”  (3:12-14,22)

How should we respond?

Yes, we will come to you, for you are the Lord our God.  (3:22)

And as God says,

Break up your unplowed ground and do not sow among thorns.  Circumcise yourselves to the Lord, circumcise your hearts.  (4:3-4)

In other words, soften your heart towards God.  Break up the hardness of your heart.  Pull out the thorns of sin.  And cut out the things in your life that would keep you from him.

When we do this, our repentance will not only affect us, but the people around us.

As God says,

“If you will return, O Israel, return to me,” declares the Lord.  “If you put your detestable idols out of my sight and no longer go astray, and if in a truthful, just and righteous way you swear, ‘As surely as the Lord lives,’ then the nations will be blessed by him and in him they will glory.”  (4:1-2)

In short, when we return to the Lord in true repentance, and truly start living for him, all the people around us start to be blessed as he works through us to touch them.

May we all have hearts that are softened towards him that we may touch the world around us.

About bkshiroma

I'm from Hawaii, but have been in Japan as a missionary/English teacher since 1995. I'm currently going to a church called Crossroad Nishinomiya, an international church in Nishinomiya, a city right between Kobe and Osaka. Check out their website: crossroad-web.com 私がハワイから来ましたけど1995年に宣教師と英会話の教師として日本に引っ越しました。 今西宮にあるクロスロード西宮という国際の教会に行っています。どうぞ、そのホムページを見てください: crossroad-web.com
This entry was posted in Jeremiah, Major Prophets, Old Testament and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Jeremiah 3-4 — False repentance

  1. Darius says:

    This is true. We must not only say words but we must have a mind to change our ways. We must not only confess our sins but forsake them with the intent never to go back into sin again. This should not therefore be a process but a turning away from sin and a turning to God.

    I thought of thorns and it made me think of the parable of the sower. The cares of life choking the word and it becoming unfruitful. As you say it doesn’t profit us or anyone around us either.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s